Tag Archives: Skill Set

Acquiring New Skills

TryYou are ready to make a change in your career, but you are currently at a fork in the road.  Do you stay within the same role in a new company, or are you ready for substantial change?  Depending on the answer, you may have to go back to school to learn a new skill set.  However, before taking on the financial burden, do research.

Call a hiring manager who has experience hiring for positions like the one you are interested in, ask what qualifications they are looking for and what would set someone apart from the pack in their pile of applications.  Call someone who is in the current position you are seeking, ask what credentials they had at the time of hire.  How they landed their job? What organizations they are involved in?  What is their education level?

From these conversations decide if going back to school is for you and necessary to land your dream job, or if you could perhaps pick up these skills by volunteering or by taking a similar position that you are more qualified for.  Write your plan on paper, develop a timeline, develop a budget and then go for it!

Interview Tips to Land the Job

TravelYour resume is polished and out there, you have been making networking connections like it is your full time job and you now you have landed an interview! After you congratulate yourself, panic sets in. Relax; proper preparation is all you need to ace this!

The more you prepare for the interview, the more comfortable and effective you will be interviewing.

1. Practice
Practice for your interview by preparing responses to typical job interview questions. Practice in front of a mirror so you can check your body language or with a family member or friend so you can receive performance feedback.

2. Prepare
Prepare to use specific examples to highlight your skill set. Provide evidence of your work successes to promote yourself as the best job applicant.

It is also important to have prepared questions to ask the employer when the interviewer asks.

3. Study
Research the employer and their industry to prepare yourself when/if you are asked, “What can you tell me about our company?”  Try to relate what you have learned about the company when answering your interview questions.

Remember the interviewer’s name and use it during the job interview.

4. Dress for the Job
When preparing for your interview, ensure you are dressed appropriately and that your appearance is neat and tidy.  If you are bringing a portfolio of your work, prepare it so that it looks professionally done and not something thrown together at the last minute.

5. Be Early
To be on time for an interview is to be ten minutes early. Prepare for this by driving the route you will take at the same time of day, prior to the interview. Know exactly where you are going in the building and who to ask for when you arrive.

6. Stay Composed
Before and during the job interview it is important to try to stay as calm possible. Your body language says as much about you as your answers to the questions you will be asked. If you prepare properly, you will naturally be more confident and comfortable in your responses.

Pay close attention to the questions being asked, listen to the full question. Maintain eye contact with the interviewer to show that you are taking the interview seriously and are focused. If you get thrown off your game, take a second to regroup. The interview isn’t a race.

7. Demonstrate Your Knowledge
When you answer the interview questions, relate what you know about the company and industry into your answers.  Work to match your career achievements to what the company is looking for in the position you are interested in.

8. Follow Up!
Always follow-up with a thank you note that restates your interest in the position. This is a perfect time to include details you did not have a chance to mention at the time of the interview. If you had multiple interviewers, send a personalized note to each of them. Electronic thank you notes are also acceptable if this is a form of communication your interviewer(s) is comfortable with.

Is More School Necessary for this Job?

notebookYou are ready to make a change in your career, but you are currently at a fork in the road.  Do you stay within the same role in a new company, or are you ready for substantial change?  Depending on the answer, you may have to go back to school to learn a new skill set.  However, before taking on the financial burden, do research.

Call a hiring manager who has experience hiring for positions like the one you are interested in, ask what qualifications they are looking for and what would set someone apart from the pack in their pile of applications.  Call someone who is in the current position you are seeking, ask what credentials they had at the time of hire.  How they landed their job? What organizations they are involved in?  What is their education level?

From these conversations decide if going back to school is for you and necessary to land your dream job, or if you could perhaps pick up these skills by volunteering or by taking a similar position that you are more qualified for.  Write your plan on paper, develop a timeline, develop a budget and then go for it!