Tag Archives: Skills

Acquiring New Skills

TryYou are ready to make a change in your career, but you are currently at a fork in the road.  Do you stay within the same role in a new company, or are you ready for substantial change?  Depending on the answer, you may have to go back to school to learn a new skill set.  However, before taking on the financial burden, do research.

Call a hiring manager who has experience hiring for positions like the one you are interested in, ask what qualifications they are looking for and what would set someone apart from the pack in their pile of applications.  Call someone who is in the current position you are seeking, ask what credentials they had at the time of hire.  How they landed their job? What organizations they are involved in?  What is their education level?

From these conversations decide if going back to school is for you and necessary to land your dream job, or if you could perhaps pick up these skills by volunteering or by taking a similar position that you are more qualified for.  Write your plan on paper, develop a timeline, develop a budget and then go for it!

Your Resume is a Hiring Manager’s First Look at You

Your resume is the first representation of yourself a hiring manager will see. This simple piece of paper with words written to describe who you are at work and the skills you can bring to the company is your first step to a new job. With this paper, you have only a few seconds to grab the attention of the reader and make him/her want to learn more about you and how you could contribute to their team.

Before sending out your resume, ask yourself: Is this compelling? Have I properly highlighted my skills and accomplishments? How will I differentiate myself from other applicants? Can the hiring manager understand how I will add value to the team?

Study the job posting and identify the skills the company is seeking as well as possible skills inferred from the listing. Make it simple for the hiring manager to see how your skill set would be a perfect fit for this position. If you don’t have the exact skills they are seeking, look at transferable skills obtained from previous work that could relate to the job you are applying for.

Every employer wants to hire an accomplished problem-solver. Be sure to emphasize your past accomplishments, both team and individual, and highlight the positive outcomes. Use words that show initiative and value add. Examples include: exceeded, increased, decreased, eliminated, developed, launched, and spearheaded.

Stay away from vague claims about attitude and personal strength. Examples of this: reliable, responsible, self-starter. Use the interview time to show your motivation and discuss your tenacity for timeliness.

The most important resume tip is to review your resume and proofread, proofread, proofread!  This is the first impression a hiring manager will have, don’t waste it!

Customize Your Skill Set

imagesHow do you make your skill set, job history, volunteering, hobbies and education work for you when job hunting?  You just need to know how to make your skill set applicable to the career that you are aiming for.  Many positions have similar needs; such as, good customer relationship building, time management, and problem solving.  These skills may be attained in a variety of settings, from serving/waitressing, supervising, project management, nanny positions, study groups, teaching, etc.  Thusly, they can be applied to many different jobs as a valuable skill.

To start, look at the job that you are seeking and identify three important abilities that will be needed to perform the job functions.  Then look over your skills and describe how and where you got them and how they will be beneficial in the job and environment that you are applying for.  Always use a customized cover letter and resume, proving your points on how you will be a perfect fit for the job.  By customizing your skills you increase the relevancy of them and your fit for the job while decreasing the importance of areas you may not be as strong in, such as education or work history.

Sell Yourself and Your Skills

How do you make your skill set, job history, volunteering, hobbies and education work for you when job hunting?  You just need to know how to make your skill set applicable to the career that you are applying for.  Many positions have similar needs; such as, good customer relationship building, time management, and problem solving.  These skills may be attained in a variety of settings, from nanny jobs, serving/waitressing, supervising, project management, study groups, teaching, etc.  Thus, they can be applied to many different jobs as a valuable skill.

To start, look at the job that you are seeking and identify three important abilities that will be needed to perform the job functions.  Then look over your skills and describe how and where you got them and how they will be beneficial in the job and environment that you are applying for.  Always use a customized cover letter and resume proving your points on how you will be a perfect fit for the job.  By customizing your skills you increase the relevancy of them and your fit for the job while decreasing the importance of areas you may not be as strong in, such as education or job history.